Saturday, February 20, 2010

C# Thread Synchronization


Multithreading enables you to have several threads of execution running at the same time. But in this case there is a risk of one thread trying to access resource when another tread is working on the resource. In short they all compete for the same set of resources, so there must be a mechanism to ensure synchronization and communication among threads.

You can use the following ways to synchronize your threads:
  1. The Interlocked class

    // Summary:
    //     Provides atomic operations for variables that are shared by multiple threads.
    public static class Interlocked
    {
public static int Decrement(ref int location)
public static long Decrement(ref long location);
public static int Increment(ref int location);
        //
        // Summary:
        //     Increments a specified variable and stores the result, as an atomic operation.
        //
        // Parameters:
        //   location:
        //     The variable whose value is to be incremented.
        //
        // Returns:
        //     The incremented value.
        //
        // Exceptions:
        //   System.NullReferenceException:
        //     The address of location is a null pointer.
        public static long Increment(ref long location);
}


use can use the Interlocked class like the foloowing

        static int _inum = 0;
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
           
        }

        static void Add()
        {
            Interlocked.Increment(ref _inum);
        }
        static void Sub()
        {
            Interlocked.Decrement(ref _inum);
        }

Increment & Decrement are the main two functions of the class. Check out the documentation for other methods

  1. The C# lock keyword

Use this method to keep multiple statements Thread safe; to lock a block of code, give the lock statement an object as argument.

class Program
    {
        static int _inum = 0;
        static object _obj = new object();
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Thread tAdd = new Thread(Add)
            {
                Name = "Add thread"
            };
            tAdd.Start(1);
            Thread tSub = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Program.Sub));
            tSub.Start(1);

            //Add(14);
            //Sub(10);
            Console.ReadLine();
           
        }

        static void Add(object _val)
        {
            int val = Convert.ToInt32(_val);
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                lock (_obj)
                {
                    _inum += val;
                    Console.WriteLine("new value after add= " + _inum);
                    Console.WriteLine("current thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.Name);
                    Console.WriteLine();
                }
            }
        }
        static void Sub(object _val)
        {
            int val = Convert.ToInt32(_val);
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                lock (_obj)
                {
                    _inum -= val;
                    Console.WriteLine("new value after sub= " + _inum);
                }
            }
        }
    }




  1. The Monitor class

The limitation of the lock statement is that you do not have the capability to release the lock halfway through the critical section. This is important because there are situations in which one thread needs to release the lock so that other threads have a chance to proceed before the first thread can resume its execution.
    //     Provides a mechanism that synchronizes access to objects.
    [ComVisible(true)]
    public static class Monitor
    {
public static void Enter(object obj);
        //
        // Summary:
        //     Releases an exclusive lock on the specified object.
        //
        // Parameters:
        //   obj:
        //     The object on which to release the lock.
        //
        // Exceptions:
        //   System.ArgumentNullException:
        //     The obj parameter is null.
        //
        //   System.Threading.SynchronizationLockException:
        //     The current thread does not own the lock for the specified object.
        [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.Success)]
        public static void Exit(object obj);
        //
        // Summary:
        //     Notifies a thread in the waiting queue of a change in the locked object's
        //     state.
        //
        // Parameters:
        //   obj:
        //     The object a thread is waiting for.
        //
        // Exceptions:
        //   System.ArgumentNullException:
        //     The obj parameter is null.
        //
        //   System.Threading.SynchronizationLockException:
        //     The calling thread does not own the lock for the specified object.
        public static void Pulse(object obj);
        //
        // Summary:
        //     Notifies all waiting threads of a change in the object's state.
        //
        // Parameters:
        //   obj:
        //     The object that sends the pulse.
        //
        // Exceptions:
        //   System.ArgumentNullException:
        //     The obj parameter is null.
        //
        //   System.Threading.SynchronizationLockException:
        //     The calling thread does not own the lock for the specified object.
        public static void PulseAll(object obj);
}

In the previous example the value of inum can be less than 0 but with lock statement I couldn’t prevent/stop the thread from doing this so but with Monitor class I can set such conditions & check for other similar business conditions.

The Add & Sub methods can be re-written like the following using the Monitor class

        static void Add(object _val)
        {
            int val = Convert.ToInt32(_val);
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                Monitor.Enter(_obj);
                _inum += val;
                Console.WriteLine("new value after add= " + _inum);
                Console.WriteLine("current thread: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.Name);
                Console.WriteLine();
                Monitor.Exit(_obj);
            }

        }
        static void Sub(object _val)
        {
            int val = Convert.ToInt32(_val);
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                Monitor.Enter(_obj);
                _inum -= val;
                if (_inum < 1)
                    Monitor.Pulse(_obj);
                Console.WriteLine("new value after sub= " + _inum);
                Monitor.Exit(_obj);
            }
        }

The Enter() method of the Monitor class acquires a lock on the specified object, and the Exit()
method releases the lock. The code enclosed by the Enter() and Exit() methods is the critical section. The Pulse() method of the Monitor sends a signal to the waiting thread that the lock is now released and is now going to pass back to it.
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